University College London (UCL)

University College LondonUniversity College London (UCL) is London's leading multidisciplinary university.

Two UCL’s institutes are involved in PROPAG-AGEING:

  • The Institute of Neurology, established in 1950, is a key component of the Faculty of Brain Sciences at UCL and it has traditionally been a leading in clinical and molecular research in Parkinson’s disease. The Institute of is closely associated in its work with the National Hospital Queen Square for Neurology & Neurosurgery (NHNN), the first hospital to be established in England dedicated exclusively to treating the diseases of the nervous system. In combination they form a world renowned centre of excellence for teaching, training and research in neurology and allied clinical and basic neurosciences at a national and international level.
  • The Proteomic and Metabolomic Research Facility at the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH) & Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) was created for both clinical and basic research for the diagnosis and elucidation of disease mechanisms. This combined proteomic and metabolomic mass spectrometry facility provides a unique environment whereby both clinical and non-clinical researchers work side by side, using state-of-the-art technology, to study the pathogenesis of childhood and adult disease.
  • The Neurogenetics Unit at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery offers a fully integrated laboratory encompassing genetic research, clinical assessment, diagnosis, molecular genetic testing and counselling for neurogenetic conditions. The focus of much of the research is the molecular basis of neurogenetic disorders and these include channelopathies, neuropathies and mitochondrial disease as well as common diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. The laboratory is well placed to perform these studies as we have some of the largest clinically characterised cohorts of patients nationally and worldwide. The Neurogenetics Laboratory is one of the best equipped in the world with HiSeq2500, HiSeq3000, MiSeq, robotics and a state of the art variant identification pipeline.

Kailash Bhatia

Kailash Bathia

 

 

Kailash Bhatia is Professor of Clinical Neurology at UCL. His research interests are to delineate clinical phenotypes of different forms of movement disorders particularly in dystonia and parkinsonian conditions. He is a well recognized expert in movement disorders and PD with over 450 publications and very large clinical experience.

 

 

 

 

Contacts

Prof. Kailash Bhatia
Institute of Neurology, UCL, 12 Queen Square, London (UK)
Ph: 0845 155 5000
e-mail: k.bhatia@ucl.ac.uk


Kevin Mills

Kevin Mills

 

 

Kevin Mills is head of the Proteomic and Metabolomic Research Centre at the UCL Institute of Child Health (ICH) & Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH). His research activity focuses on translational research and aims to establish rapid, sensitive methods to study, diagnose and monitor the treatment of patients.

 

 

 

 

Contacts

Prof. Kevin Mills
Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London (UK)
Ph: 0207 905 2873
e-mail: kevin.mills@ucl.ac.uk


Henry Houlden

Henry Houlden

 

Henry Houlden is head of the Neurogenetics Laboratory at the UCL Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology. His research focuses on neurogenetics, neurodegeneration and mitochondrial disorders. He has developed a number of rapid, sensitive sequencing and analysis methods.

 

 

Contacts

Prof. Henry Houlden
6th floor DNA lab, Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG (UK)
Ph: 0203 448 4068
e-mail: h.houlden@ucl.ac.uk